Beating chemo-related hair loss with Scalp Cooling

Posted by in Looking Good, News, Treatments, Well being | 1 comment

When cancer survivor Lizelle Knott was diagnosed with breast cancer, there was one thing that she just couldn’t accept: losing her hair. Again. At age 16, Lizelle had been diagnosed with Stage IV Lymphoma, and the treatment made all her hair fall out – a devastating experience for a young girl. Now a wife and mother, Lizelle had no choice about fighting cancer a second time – but this time, she made up her mind to hang onto her hair. Like so many who have grieved the loss of their hair, for Lizelle this wasn’t about vanity, it was about privacy. Having the right to decide who gets to know that you are sick, and how they learn about it. With a fifteen month old toddler to consider, Lizelle also wanted to look “normal” for his sake. Psychiatrist Dr Tanveer Baig of the Royal Marsden Hospital in London says that hair loss is the symptom associated with the most distress two months after surgery; as many as 8% of cancer patients say they considered refusing treatment because of expected hair loss. On the other hand, according to Dr Baig, there is increased tolerance for the other side effects of chemotherapy if hair loss can be reduced. Lizelle had heard about a non-invasive treatment which can prevent hair loss during chemotherapy, and decided to try it with the support of her oncologist in East London. The principle is simple: Hair grows from follicles lying just below our scalps. They are energy rich and require a good blood supply. If the scalp can be kept cold enough, growth activity in the follicle is suppressed, reducing blood flow. What’s more, the small blood vessels around the follicles constrict, allowing minimal blood to get through. The first few hours of a chemotherapy treatment is a critical time to protect the hair roots so that hair does not fall out. So how hard can it be, just to keep a cool head for those few hours? In practice, it was far from simple to rescue her crowning glory! The use of Cold Caps to prevent hair loss during chemotherapy was trialled in Europe as long ago as 2000 and is now going through further tests in California and New York. So far, the trials have shown an 81% success rate. As many as 50 000 patients worldwide have tried scalp cooling, yet it’s still not well known nor offered in most cancer treatment centres. Undeterred, Lizelle persisted with the help of resourceful staff at GVI Oncology in East London, who put her in touch with GVI Cape Town (Sandton Oncology Centre in Johannesburg can also help). East London had two Elastogel Hypothermia Caps, and...

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Breast Cancer: The most important facts

Posted by in Authors, Blog, Diagnosis, Prevention, Treatments | 0 comments

Sometimes, it can seem as though breast cancer is everywhere: everyone knows someone, everyone’s family is touched by it. The chord struck by breast cancer is evident in the avalanche of pink ribbons that’s everywhere from the Internet to our streets, and the many stories of those who have survived as well as tributes to those who did not. There are many spin-offs from this high level of public awareness, and one of them is ready funding for more research, which is showing great results. But even though the general public may be more aware of “breast cancer” than is true for most other forms of cancer, international research shows that most women who have been treated for breast cancer, do not know what kind of tumour they had. Yet from any doctor’s point of view, this is first-ranking information! Momentum Health’s JUMP magazine recently interviewed some top South African breast cancer specialists to find out what they regard as the most important facts about breast cancer (see Issue 1, 2015). So here’s what you should know: * Don’t panic. The great majority of lumps that appear in breast tissue are not cancer. But don’t ignore a lump either – expert advice is needed to determine whether or not you need further treatment. * Like any other cell, a cancer cell has its own specific programming which tells it how to behave: its genetic material or DNA. This includes the likelihood of spreading to other organs, the speed at which it grows and divides to form new cancer cells, and even how it will respond to various forms of treatment. That’s another reason to get immediate expert help, because no matter how small it may be, an aggressive tumour will soon become a much worse problem. * Patients should know about the four main types of breast cancer and the treatment you can expect for each one – if you are able to catch it at an early stage. 1. Luminal A: The most common type affecting around 70% of patients and especially older women. Treatment is by cutting off the supply of oestrogen (female hormone) that feeds it; you’ll be on anti-oestrogen medication for up to five years but you won’t need chemotherapy or any other treatment. 2. Luminal B: This less common type also needs oestrogen to thrive but can continue to grow without oestrogen, so in addition to anti-oestrogen medication you will be offered a course of chemotherapy to achieve a better result. 3. HER2: This is a form of breast cancer that usually has a family history. It is treated – with much success – by a combination of chemotherapy and “molecular therapy” targeted specifically...

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Know your cancer, beat your cancer

Posted by in Authors, Blog, Diagnosis, Treatments, Well being | 0 comments

Breast cancer patients tend to be a well informed bunch, who turn up to medical appointments with print outs and well considered questions. However, a recent study in California found that only a small minority of breast cancer patients understood all the key aspects of their tumours. The stage, grade and sensitivity of your tumour determines the type of treatment you will have. Whilst thorough patient education would not necessarily change the outcome of the treatment in a direct way, it is likely to improve the patient’s experience of that treatment as well as her ability to stick with it. All of this key information is available soon after you have your first surgery. Staging indicates the spread of the tumour – how big it has grown as a single clump of cells, and/or how much it has been able to travel to other areas. Sensitivity to Oestrogen (Estrogen in America), to Progesterone and to Epithelial Growth Hormone or HER-2 is a key element of treatment because if cancer cells need these hormones for “fuel” then by blocking the hormones the growth of the cancer cell will also be blocked. Grading refers to the general aggressiveness of a tumour. If it’s made up of cells that are fairly similar to the healthy cells around it, but different to cells in other body organs, that is a low grade, less aggressive cancer. Cells that are more abnormal – more dedicated to being a cancer cell than to the function of the tissue they’re in – are higher grade and more aggressive. Knowing more about your cancer enables you to feel “part of the team” and to take more responsibility for your treatment, as well as to know what questions you want to ask (or not ask). This will ease your stress – you’ll feel much less helpless – and may help you deal with difficult side effects of the treatment such as hormone changes or chemo side effects. For most people today, the idea that “doctor knows best” is no longer enough. We want our doctors to be experts but we want to be knowledgeable as well! For doctors, this means that patient education is an important part of the treatment, time consuming as it may be. Just a treatment is individual – there is no “one size fits all” in breast cancer – so patient education also needs to be individualised. The level of explanation that is helpful for a University professor isn’t likely to be as helpful for a domestic worker, but both women need to be as informed as they can about what’s going on with the cancer and the process of treatment. There’s good news for...

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Memories that heal

Posted by in Blog, Diagnosis, Surgery, Well being | 0 comments

Uluru, also known as Ayers Rock, is a geological feature at the heart of Australia with huge cultural significance to people living there. For indigenous Australians, it is holy ground, representing millenia of history, mythology, and their symbiotic relationship with the land. Every inch of this awe inspiring rock is celebrated, represented, and connected with places far and wide across Australia through the “song-lines” which unite and re-unite people over time. Uluru is the ultimate Memory Space and a focus of healing for the peoples of Australia, both ancient and recent. In Africa we say “Umuntu ngumuntu, ngabantu” which means “a person is a person because of other people”. This finds expression in traditional African values around community and belonging. Psychologically, it is both constraining and liberating to hold this value. As individuals, we could feel smothered by a sense of responsibility for others or the demands of others. Yet, the knowledge that our very individuality is gathered by, with and for others infuses life with meaning and hope. This is especially true when illness, injury or loss shake up our ordinary lives until nothing is “normal” any more. Recently C, a wise and creative patient introduced us to the technique of the “memory space” as a guide and support through the process of cancer diagnosis and medical treatment. The idea was to use a dedicated space in her own home, to represent the experience of being diagnosed with breast cancer and of going through surgery. By inviting people who counted in her world, and who were interested in helping to create this special space, C began to share the burden of having cancer, as well as the hopes she had for the next steps in her journey with cancer. C has kindly given us permission to share this initiative via our website. It is a valuable exercise not only for recently diagnosed cancer patients but for anyone who is facing a personally devastating change or loss – whether that be divorce, illness, emigration or bereavement. Of course, it’s not easy to talk about cancer to others – especially when you’re still trying to get your own head around the news. The story is often shared with a chosen few; who usually try to respond in loving and supportive ways (though see our post on What Not to Say to Someone Who Has Cancer). C’s many years of experience and research in psychotherapy alerted her to the knowledge that more is possible – a deeper experience of Ubuntu and of love. Those invited to the ceremony were encouraged to bring whatever they felt moved to share: a note, a card, a piece of writing or music, a picture, an...

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