Uluru, also known as Ayers Rock, is a geological feature at the heart of Australia with huge cultural significance to people living there. For indigenous Australians, it is holy ground, representing millenia of history, mythology, and their symbiotic relationship with the land. Every inch of this awe inspiring rock is celebrated, represented, and connected with places far and wide across Australia through the “song-lines” which unite and re-unite people over time. Uluru is the ultimate Memory Space and a focus of healing for the peoples of Australia, both ancient and recent. In Africa we say “Umuntu ngumuntu, ngabantu” which means “a person is a person because of other people”. This finds expression in traditional African values around community and belonging. Psychologically, it is both constraining and liberating to hold this value. As individuals, we could feel smothered by a sense of responsibility for others or the demands of others. Yet, the knowledge that our very individuality is gathered by, with and for others infuses life with meaning and hope. This is especially true when illness, injury or loss shake up our ordinary lives until nothing is “normal” any more. Recently C, a wise and creative patient introduced us to the technique of the “memory space” as a guide and support through the process of cancer diagnosis and medical treatment. The idea was to use a dedicated space in her own home, to represent the experience of being diagnosed with breast cancer and of going through surgery. By inviting people who counted in her world, and who were interested in helping to create this special space, C began to share the burden of having cancer, as well as the hopes she had for the next steps in her journey with cancer. C has kindly given us permission to share this initiative via our website. It is a valuable exercise not only for recently diagnosed cancer patients but for anyone who is facing a personally devastating change or loss – whether that be divorce, illness, emigration or bereavement. Of course, it’s not easy to talk about cancer to others – especially when you’re still trying to get your own head around the news. The story is often shared with a chosen few; who usually try to respond in loving and supportive ways (though see our post on What Not to Say to Someone Who Has Cancer). C’s many years of experience and research in psychotherapy alerted her to the knowledge that more is possible – a deeper experience of Ubuntu and of love. Those invited to the ceremony were encouraged to bring whatever they felt moved to share: a note, a card, a piece of writing or music, a picture, an...